Catchphrases and Verbal Tics

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During the Naruto series, some characters use individual catchphrases or verbal tics for different reasons, like reflecting their personality.

Dattebayo, Dattebane and Dattebasa

(Da)ttebayo! (「(だ)ってばよ!」), (Da)ttebane (「(だ)ってばね」) and (Da)ttebasa (「(だ)ってばさ」) are catchphrases used by Naruto Uzumaki, his mother Kushina and his son Boruto, respectively.

Naruto's catchphrase is used at the end of most of his sentences as a way of making his speech unique. Naruto inherited this from his mother Kushina, who would instead use the catchphrase when she got excited or angry, something she had hoped her son would not inherit.[1] Naruto's son, Boruto, also inherited a variation of this verbal tic.[2]

Dattebayo and its variants have no literal English translation; however, "Believe It!" was used in the English dub whenever Naruto is making a big statement to keep a similar tone in the English version of the series. It is also used to match the lip movements from the original Japanese release. Around the start of the Chūnin Exams, however, "Believe it" fell out of use.


Usuratonkachi (ウスラトンカチ) is a catchphrase used by Sasuke Uchiha about his team-mate Naruto in a derogatory way. Sasuke has used this phrase since the Academy and most of his time on Team 7, but after facing his brother, Sasuke stopped using it, symbolising his detachment from his team.

After their last battle in Valley of the End, Sasuke called Naruto this again, symbolising his final decision to stop his ways and return to Konohagakure.[3]

"Usuratonkachi" loosely means "thin hammer" and is used in a derogatory way on a person that is perceived as "useless".


Shannarō (しゃーんなろー) is a catchphrase used by Sakura Haruno and her daughter Sarada Uchiha, something both would shout either when being too angry or excited, such as (in Sakura's case) when being annoyed by Naruto's behaviour.

In Part I, the phrase was often used by Inner Sakura (内なるサクラ, Uchi Naru Sakura).

Shannarō has no literal meaning, but can, depending on the situation, translate into Hell yeah!, Hell no!, or Damn it!. In the English dub, the phrase was replaced by a forceful Cha, which Sakura has a unique way of saying.


Mendokusē (めんどくせー, English TV: How troublesome/What a drag) is a catchphrase used by Shikamaru Nara, his son Shikadai and, sometimes, by his father Shikaku.

Shikamaru purposely uses this phrase to toss his point across that he's the type that would rather watch clouds all day than pick a fight, especially with a female opponent. He most likely "inherited" this attitude and catchphrase from his father, since his mother has a more active attitude, which he and his father sometimes find "bothersome". It can be assumed that this is the exact case with Shikamaru's and Temari's son Shikadai as well, as he too picked up this verbal tic.

In proper short-form Japanese, the phrase is mendōkusai (面倒くさい, 面倒臭い), however, Shikamaru has a habit of slurring the word, saying it with an "ē" instead of "ai". This is also the shortest possible form, making "mendokusē" an extremely rude way to say "troublesome". The proper, polite/neutral form is mendōkusai desu (面倒くさいです).

Bakayarō! Konoyarō!

Bakayarō! Konoyarō! (バカヤロー!コノヤロー!) is a catchphrase used by Killer B. It is often put after his sentences, especially when referring or talking to others, and expressed, like his normal speech pattern, as a rap.

The catchphrase could be loosely translated into "Fool! That Guy!" in a derogatory way, which however does not necessarily mean an insult, as B uses it for both foes and friends alike. The fact that the phrase is written in katakana instead of kanji or hiragana supports the strong emphasis of the phrase.

Other Examples

  • Konohamaru Sarutobi often ends his sentences with a "kore" (コレ), which could be translated into "hey", "oi" or "yo" and is usually used to get the attention of one's equals or inferiors.
  • Deidara and Zaku Abumi often ended their sentences with "un" (うん), roughly translated as "yeah" or "hm".
  • The Kōkinjō determines the word used the most by the one touched by it, with the Shichiseiken openly showing it. So far, the most used words of four characters are known:
    • Darui — "dull" (だるい, darui). This however was later replaced by "sorry" (すみません, sumimasen).
    • Samui — "cool" (クール, kūru).
    • Atsui — "hot" (あつい, atsui).
    • Ginkaku — "Kinkaku" (金角), the name of his brother.
  • According to Atsui, he created a big collection of catchphrases.[4]
  • Madara Uchiha often used the term "to dance" (踊る, odoru) while referring to battles. In the anime, he also once used the synonym "舞う" (mau).[5]
  • often ended her sentences with a "ssu" (っす).
  • The First Raikage ended his sentences with a "Yo" (よ).
  • Hinoko tends to end her sentences with a "you know".[6]
  • Magire uses the term "that's all" (以上です, ijō desu) at the end of his sentences.[7]


  • Since chapter 492 and Naruto: Shippūden episode 243, 'Dattebayo" has been translated as "you know" and more loosely as "ya know" when used by Killer B. Kushina's "(Da)ttebane" has been translated in a likewise manner.
  • In the Japanese version of Naruto episode 101, when Sakura tries to scare away the Moya Triad, she uses Naruto's "Dattebayo!".
  • After being tricked by Naruto and Killer B, Yamato used B's catchphrase in his anger.[8]
  • It is revealed in Shikamaru Hiden that when Shikamaru is going through the relationship with Temari, even after they get married, Temari often imitates him by saying this catchphrase to make fun of him.
  • In The Day Naruto Became Hokage, Konohamaru had to suppress his own verbal tic and imitate Naruto's at the same time while speaking in his stead. In the anime, Naruto had to suppress his own verbal tic as well while being disguised as Sasuke.[9]


  1. Chapter 498, pages 2-5
  2. Chapter 700
  3. Chapter 698, page 19
  4. Chapter 527, page 10
  5. Naruto: Shippūden episode 322
  6. Shikamaru Hiden
  7. Sakura Hiden
  8. Chapter 496, page 6
  9. Naruto: Shippūden episode 196

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